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DUE TO AN INCREASED VOLUME OF ORDERS, PLEASE ALLOW FOR LONGER THAN USUSAL PROCESSING TIME.
DUE TO AN INCREASED VOLUME OF ORDERS, PLEASE ALLOW FOR LONGER THAN USUSAL PROCESSING TIME.
Herbs for Beltane

Herbs for Beltane

Summer is on the horizon and mother nature is in bloom! Beltane, or “May Day”, celebrates the beginning of the brighter half of the year. This Celtic celebration carries an important traditional significance and is still revered by some as one of the most important dates in the calendar year. 

Traditionally, this day was celebrated with community gatherings, rituals, and ceremonies that welcomed a healthy and prosperous season. Today, Beltane can serve as a community reminder to practice gratitude for what we have and the abundance the new season brings. The intention comes from a place of connection, offering, and gratitude for nature and community.

On May 1, we invite you to take a moment to recognize the abundance in your life and reconnect with nature. 

 

Here are 4 ways to enjoy this beautiful Celtic celebration:

  1. Leave flowers on a friend's doorstep, spreading the warmth and generosity of spring.
  2. Plant flowers in a patio pot or garden. Try Marigolds or Sunflowers!
  3. Create a spring nature mandala. Check out @morningaltars on Instagram for some inspiration.
  4. Create a basket filled with thoughtful notes, similar to a bird's spring nest. 

3 Herbs for Beltane: 

1. Clover (Trifolium pratense)

Clover blooms in early May. It is a cooling herb that has an affinity for the glands, respiratory system, and skin. Clover purifies the blood and helps to remove metabolic waste from the lymphatic glands to help us spring forward in health.

2. Lavender (Lavandula officinalis)

This aromatic herb is used to soothe stress and uplift the spirits. Lavender calms the nervous system, allowing us to move away from our stress-filled lives to make space for peace and clarity. 

3. Oak (Quercus robur)

Oak is prized for its anti-inflammatory and astringent properties. Oak Bark is typically harvested in March and April and can be used to treat a wide array of skin disorders, such as eczema and psoriasis. 

 

Do you have a favourite May Day ritual? Share with us in the comments below!

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