Spring Nettles Spanikopita

Spring Nettles Spanikopita

Check out this delicious spring nettles recipe - there's nothing like fresh greens after a long winter!

Ingredients

2.5 Ibs. nettle leaves*
2 - 4 large onions, diced
2 bunches green onions, diced
5 cloves garlic, diced
1/2 c. parsley, chopped
1/2 c. fresh dill, chopped
1/4 tsp. ground nutmeg
salt and pepper to taste
1 Ib. feta cheese, crumbled
4 eggs, lightly beaten
1/4 c. butter or ghee, melted
2 tbsp. olive oil
1 Ib. phyllo pastry sheets

*Optional add ins: basil, spinach, kale, oregano, thyme.

Warning! Do not handle stinging nettles with your bare hands. Wear gloves or plastic bags over your hands.

Directions 

1. Preheat oven to 375º. Sauté onion, salt, and herbs in 2 tbsp. oil for 5 minutes, until the onion softens.
2. Add Nettle (and green mixture if using) and cook over medium-high heat for at least 5 minutes, until wilted.
3. Turn heat down to medium, stir in garlic and cook for another 2 or 3 minutes.
4. Remove from heat and stir in feta and pepper. Taste and add more salt and pepper as desired.
5. Get your phyllo dough out of the fridge and unwrap (unthawed if frozen). Cover phyllo stack while waiting to be used with 2 overlapping sheets of plastic wrap and then a dampened kitchen towel (to keep it from drying out). Lay out a sheet of the dough in the baking dish (it will overlap the sides). Brush each layer with heated butter; lay another on top, for a total of 8-10 sheets.
6. Spread half of the spinach mixture over the dough. Lay out another 8-10 sheets of phyllo as above. Some people like to do this as only one layer of nettle mixture, skipping the middle phyllo layer. Spread the rest of the spinach on top, and then lay out 8-10 more sheets (buttering each layer). Brush the top with butter and tuck the phyllo sheets into the pan.⠀
10. Bake uncovered for 30 – 45 minutes, until golden-brown and crispy.

Inspired by Dr. Terry Willard

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Comments

Harmonic Arts - June 4, 2019

Hi Linda, Nettles do have a sting, so there are some precautions you can take when picking and eating them. First of all, wear gloves when harvesting and handling! If you are drying your nettles, they become much less potent when they are dry, and can be rehydrated for cooking. If you are using them fresh, the stinging effect will go away once they are cooked. Some people do eat them raw by folding the outer edges of the leaves in (as that is where the stinging compounds are found), rolling up the leaf, and popping it in their mouth, but we recommend drying or cooking them as the best preparation method. ;)

linda kelley - June 4, 2019

I remember on a camping trip with my sons. I brushed by a nettle plant and it really bit me. I was scratching, it was terrible. I can’t imagine eating them. It doesn’t hurt you?

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